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Top nomination for police inspector

PUBLISHED: 14:43 03 November 2008 | UPDATED: 12:10 03 July 2010

A GORLESTON based police inspector has been nominated for a top national award.

Insp Nick Rusell will hear on Thursday if he has won the prestigious Community Police Officer of the Year at the Jane's Police Review Gala Awards in London.

A GORLESTON based police inspector has been nominated for a top national award.

Insp Nick Rusell will hear on Thursday if he has won the prestigious Community Police Officer of the Year at the Jane's Police Review Gala Awards in London.

Insp Russell, 39, worked on the Norfolk force's trial of head cameras with frontline officers, IT staff and the photographic department to try and come up with a system that suited officers.

He produced a report on the camera's potential and the cost of rolling it out across the force and is currently working on a package for training officers to use the system.

He has also introduced three new youth projects in the Great Yarmouth area including setting up an amateur boxing club and finding funding for an off-road cycling club and to create a community radio station.

Ian Learmonth, deputy chief constable of Norfolk Constabulary, said: “He has taken his role to heart and delivered more than perhaps even he could have imagined. He personifies a community police officer and the template on which all Norfolk officers should base themselves.”

Earlier this year, he received the Sir Ronnie Flanagan Award for Outstanding Performer of the Year as part of the first ever Noscas - the Norfolk Safer Community Awards.

The officer, who is married to Sue and has two daughters Alex and Samantha, has been in the force for 11 years and was until recently working as a sergeant at Haven Bridge House.

The Community Police Officer of the Year Award was established as a national event in 1992 to promote a positive side of police work which seldom gets the publicity it deserves. Officers are nominated for the award by their forces and judged on their personal skills and local initiatives to combat crime.

Each nomination also requires evidence of the community's support for the officer's work and should include a brief outline to set out what they have achieved.


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