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Young actor in gutsy bid for stardom

PUBLISHED: 10:42 05 May 2009 | UPDATED: 13:50 03 July 2010

After being expelled from school at 15 and winning a place at a prestigious drama school four years later, Jarone Macklin-Page has never let anything stand in the way of his dream to be an actor.

After being expelled from school at 15 and winning a place at a prestigious drama school four years later, Jarone Macklin-Page has never let anything stand in the way of his dream to be an actor.

Now the ambitious 20-year-old is packing his bags once again to travel the country in a professional theatre production and preparing for a series of television auditions.

After a difficult time at home, Mr Macklin-Page moved into the Break children's home in Mundesley, aged 14. By the age of 15, he had been expelled from school and it looked like his life was starting to spiral out of control.

He eventually found that acting was something he enjoyed and he studied for a BTEC national diploma in performing arts at Yarmouth College and then moved to London last year to train at the Italia Conti theatre school.

Now after just two terms honing his skills in the capital, Mr Macklin-Page is getting ready to star in a new touring production of Charles Dyer's play Rattle of a Simple Man, which will see him acting in theatre venues in Darlington and Cardiff in June.

Mr Macklin-Page is also lined up for auditions in TV soaps including Hollyoaks and Emmerdale.

He said: “While I was in London, my agent was saying that there had been a lot of interest in hiring me, so I decided to leave and try my luck.

“I took a really gutsy decision but I've found that you have to grab chances while they're there.

“There's a chance I could spend three years at theatre school but then find that the offers of work have dried up.

“It seems to have been the right decision, because I'm now getting ready for a seven-week tour with the play and have auditions lined up for Emmerdale, Waterloo Road and Hollyoaks.”

He said that rather than treating his difficult start in life as an obstacle to having a successful career, he has realised that his time in a children's home made him a stronger person and can be used to inspire others.

“I'm working on setting up a project so that I can go back to Break homes and run acting courses so that the young people living there can produce a film or a show for the local community.

“Hopefully that would help to get rid of some of the stigma associated with it,” he said.


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