Search

Anglers face winter weather

PUBLISHED: 08:54 21 March 2008 | UPDATED: 10:40 03 July 2010

For anglers hoping to bag up over the holiday break it will not seem like Easter at all at the waterside, rather more like winter.

And for sea anglers fishing from both beach and boat, conditions will be distinctly uncomfortable in brisk north or north-easterly winds carrying cold air down from the Arctic Circle, writes Roy Webster.

For anglers hoping to bag up over the holiday break it will not seem like Easter at all at the waterside, rather more like winter.

And for sea anglers fishing from both beach and boat, conditions will be distinctly uncomfortable in brisk north or north-easterly winds carrying cold air down from the Arctic Circle, writes Roy Webster.

Boat anglers in recent weeks have been enjoying a mini cod rush from marks up to a mile offshore. But over the next few days the North Sea may represent a serious hazard for any anglers putting out in vessels much smaller than an inshore trawler.

So, to be safe, a call to the coastguard for up-to-date bulletins on the sea state off Great Yarmouth would be advisable.

Along the local beaches the elements will be straight into the angler's teeth. And really there is no hiding place unless shelter is sought in the harbour where prospects are rather uncertain for any species other than flat fish or undersized codling.

The sea undoubtedly will be rough off the north and central beaches, but a decent codling or two fit for the pan remains possible for the intrepid rod man prepared to brave the wintery conditions. The best advice is to head south where there are better opportunities of bringing something home for the pot.

The Suffolk beaches as far down as Orford have relinquished quite a few decent codling to the 4lb mark and the odd succulent sole.

Now that the coarse fishing season for the rivers and broads is over, freshwater anglers will be heading for the commercial fisheries that are exempt from the statutory 93-day break, providing they are located outside the boundaries of the Broads Authority executive area or not within a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

The Environment Agency law and enforcement officers have now placed this issue under the microscope or, to be more precise, are studying all the relevant maps in order to reach a decision as to whether fishing can go ahead on waters on the borderline locations.

Once this investigation is complete it would be most helpful for anglers to see a list of all landlocked waters within the broads or in SSSIs that are subject to the close season.

Looking back on last term, the whole of the broads fishers, tidal and

non-tidal, suffered at the hands of Mother Nature.

Summer and autumn floods were followed by a serious saltwater surge into the broads last November, seriously affecting angling, with the possibility of serious fish kills from saline poisoning. Match anglers may be the best judges of these serious mortalities next summer.

Bream and perch anglers actually enjoyed a bumper season, especially on Hickling Broad and in the River Bure at St Benets Abbey.

On the downside, pike anglers, despite wild unauthenticated reports of 30-pounders every week from the Thurne Valley, had a poor season with the Trinity Broads probably the best of the bunch and where one or two boats may be available next

season in the syndicate organised by

Richard Barnes at the Filby Restaurant (01493 368142).

On Horsey Mere the final 14 days of unlimited pike fishing by permit went unnoticed and the only real news from this nature reserve was disgraceful poaching throughout the autumn and winter that has seriously threatened the privilege of fishing this private water.

This weekend will not demand short- sleeve order on the carp and tench lakes. It will be thermal underwear, fleece jackets and woolly hats to combat the chill, but once the sun rises higher in the sky the prospects of decent rewards are promising.

The still waters recommended over the Easter break are the lakes at Hall Farm, Burgh Castle, the fishery that was once known as Green Pits, and Holly Farm, South Walsham.

In north Norfolk there are the prolific lakes at Gimingham, Gunton Park, Cobbleacre in Hevingham and Chapel Road, Roughton.

Reepham Lakes where family fishing is encouraged is open as are the Swangey Lakes, Waveney Valley and Taverham Lakes that offer superb carp and tench fishing.

So the advice is: Wrap up well and take two flasks of hot drink along to keep the blood circulating while awaiting those tantalising bites.

Open match fixture: March 23, RNLI open. 01603 759624.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Great Yarmouth Mercury

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists