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Techno entertainment - forget it!

PUBLISHED: 17:34 15 May 2008 | UPDATED: 11:04 03 July 2010

IF local theatre stalwarts Marilyn Durrant and Terry Wing had been born into today's techno age there is little doubt that neither would have enjoyed the fun from 40 years association with local amateur theatre groups.

IF local theatre stalwarts Marilyn Durrant and Terry Wing had been born into today's techno age there is little doubt that neither would have enjoyed the fun from 40 years association with local amateur theatre groups.

For Marilyn and Terry the choices of entertainment available to them in their childhood was limited, which perhaps explains why they each became involved in local theatre groups and have enjoyed a great friendship and much enjoyment along the way.

Marilyn was brought up amongst entertainers with her father Sam Watson a professional entertainer plying his trade as a song and dance man in the numerous clubs and theatres of Yorkshire.

She said: “As a youngster I loved going to watch Dad entertaining at the venues whenever I could. There were no colleges in those days that specialised in training stars of the future so I learnt all I could from watching him on stage.”

Following school, Marilyn worked as a clerk leaving her home town of Sheffield in the mid 1960s for Great Yarmouth where she would later meet not only her future husband but lifelong friend Terry Wing.

She added: “Well entertaining was in my blood so it was no surprise that I sought out local shows to watch but it was when I watched Red Riding Hood performed by the theatre group from the Shrublands Youth and Adult Centre in Gorleston at the then Floral Hall, Gorleston that I thought I wouldn't mind joining the group especially as I rather took a shine to the young chap wearing leather shorts.”

That young chap turned out to be Marilyn's future husband Brian.

Also watching that same pantomime was Terry and it was following that performance that both Terry and Marilyn signed up to join the theatre group prompted by the centre administrator Julian Macey, Terry recalls the early years with fond memories.

“Mr Macey took us to the theatre where rehearsals for the revue Country Style were in full swing. It may not sound very glamorous but we were sent back stage to help and one of the first things we did was to help with props making mashed potatoes for a scene from the hit TV series Ponderosa.”

The all-singing all-dancing musical 42nd Street will be performed at the Britannia Theatre at 7.30pm each evening from next Thursday May 22 to Saturday May 24 inclusive with a matinee at 2.30pm on the Saturday. Tickets are £12, £10 conc and £8 children.

Britannia Theatre Box Office telephone 01493 842209 or online at www.britannia-pier.co.uk.

ends


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