Renewed objections to demolition of pub empty for a decade

What now for the First and Last pub in Ormesby empty for ten years?

The First and Last pub in January 2022 cuts a sorry figure as a planning saga continues. - Credit: Liz Coates

Developers looking to put houses, flats, and shops on a former pub site are facing another round of planning consultation.

New notices have gone up outside the First and Last pub in Ormesby, saying people have until January 27 to have their say.

What now for First and Last pub empty for ten years?

The latest planning notice tied to railings at the former First and Last pub site in Ormesby St Margaret in January 2022. - Credit: Liz Coates

The pub shut a decade ago with various bids for housing triggering local dismay and an effort to have it listed as a community asset.

A scheme to knock it down and add a terrace of ten homes was refused in 2015 on the grounds it would "urbanise" the site.

Two years later a bid to convert it into housing and add three homes was given the green light.

Plans submitted in July 2020 looked to renew the permission, but were revised to involve knocking down the pub and building two shops with flats above.

Two detached houses and a terrace of three cottages were also proposed.

What now for First and Last Pub empty for ten years?

Parts of the First and Last pub date from the late 18th century. A bid to knock it down and build shops and flats is in the hands of planners. - Credit: Liz Coates

However, changes to the scheme mean the plans are being consulted on again.

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Under the revised plans two semi-detached, three-bedroom houses are proposed instead of the terrace, and the detached homes will have detached double garages.

People have already signalled their objection to the commercial aspect, and to the loss of the pub building at the gateway entrance to the village.

Meanwhile conservationists have renewed their concerns tagging the demolition "unjustified".

In a letter they say the historic part of the pub dates back to the late 18th century and is a "distinctive heritage asset."

It goes on to say because of its landmark position and proximity to other listed buildings it should be converted rather than knocked down.

The parish council has always signalled its preference for the building to be retained.

In December 2019 it was hit by fire, four fire crews rushing to save the derelict building described as “an eyesore.”

Then in February 2020 it came up for sale at auction securing a bid for £324,000 which failed to make the reserve.

The following month it made a return to the saleroom, this time with a lower guide price of between £280,000-£300,000.

More recently its car park hosted the Yankee Traveller's Airstream burger van.

To view the plans and comment visit the borough council's planning portal quoting 06/20/0278/F.